Customer Service 0344 481 1001

Where did June go? Not in a sunny haze that’s for sure. One thing that is for certain though is that lots of rain brings lots of lush growth – and lots of jobs for the gardener.

We’re just coming to the end of what I think of as the ‘critical period’ of the gardening year where there’s still just about time to make sure you get the very best out of your garden this summer. Here are my top 5 jobs for the coming fortnight:

1.    Feed your plants
Give a high potash feed to anything that you grow for its flowers or fruit. LINK to feeding blog. General purpose fertiliser is fine for foliage plants like ferns and hostas. Pay particular attention to plants in pots – especially if they’ve been in the same pot for a while. A dose of feed now will help keep your plants looking lush all over the summer months. More advice of feeding plants here. LINK http://blog.bakker.co.uk/muck-magic/

2.    Weed all about it
Get in quick before they set seed. If it ever stops raining, get the hoe out on your vegetable patch. If you haven’t got time to do some proper weeding, even just snipping off the weeds’ flowers is still a help.

3.    Sow some seeds
It’s not too late to sow LINK http://blog.bakker.co.uk/late-late-sow/ salad crops like lettuce and radicchio, plus carrots and French beans – you’ll get fresh, tasty crops right into the autumn months

4.    Go on slug watch.
Wet, warm weather suits slugs down to the ground. As with so many things in gardening, it’s much better to keep doing a bit at a time rather than having a huge go at it then doing nothing for a month. For more info on dealing with slugs see my previous blog post LINK http://blog.bakker.co.uk/war-slugs-part-1/

5.    Get netting
Net your fruit bushes as soon as the fruit starts to ripen. This is especially important for strawberries, currant bushes and red raspberries (for some reason birds don’t seem to attack yellow raspberries as much). Always secure the net tightly round your plants, and weigh it down to ensure there are no gaps, otherwise you risk trapping birds inside the net rather than keeping them out!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *