The water saving garden part 3

Generally speaking, container growing is a water-extravagant form of gardening as most plants grown in containers dry out much faster than if they were planted direct into the garden soil. On the other hand, ornamental tubs and the like can be a very attractive feature of a garden. If for one reason or another containers are essential, use as large ones as possible, fill with soil-based compost, and incorporate water-retaining …Read More

81581

Suitable plants for container planting

Shrubs for permanent planting in medium and large tubs

Top fruit on dwarfing rootstocks. Not very windy sites.
Small acer (maple) species. Not very windy sites.
Aucuba (spotted laurel).
Bay {Laurus nobilis).
Berberis (barberry).
Camellias. Cool sites, ericaceous compost and lime-free water needed, not for exposed positions.
Ceanothus (Californian lilac). Not very windy sites.
Choisya ternata (Mexican orange blossom). Not very windy sites.
Cistus (sun rose). Not very windy sites.
Cotoneaster.
Daphne. Not cold or windy sites.
Elaeagnus (oleaster).
Escallonia. Not cold sites.
Euonymus …Read More

Maintenance of containers

Maintenance of containers

In winter, very little need be done if suitable containers were used in the first place and the planting done properly. Large, heavy stone troughs, tubs, etc., should not freeze solid except under very extreme conditions. Cheaper, thin concrete and plastic containers can freeze through in certain circumstances and therefore if the plants in them are somewhat choice and if it is at all possible, they should be placed in …Read More

How to plant up tubs, troughs and other containers (including solid hanging baskets and pots)

If you are only using your container for a temporary display — for example, summer bedding and winter/spring bedding (not hanging pots for the latter), a good soil-less compost will be quite adequate. In a reasonably large tub, or whatever, you can usually get two consecutive plantings from one fill-up of compost — say, a spring bedding scheme of wallflowers and bulbs followed by a summer one of geraniums, French …Read More

Wall Containers

Wall containers

Again, there is a wide choice available and while it is possible to improvise by screwing or suspending plastic food containers and the like on the wall, much more of the receptacle can be seen than in the case of those which stand on the ground, and improvised ones can look rather shoddy so it is perhaps better not to spoil the ship for a ha’porth of tar.

Containers suitable for …Read More

potterieheader3

Free standing containers

In theory, as long as a thing is capable of holding a reasonable amount of compost, you can grow something in it, and you do not have to spend a lot of money on something specifically designed for the purpose. Here are a few ideas for improvised containers:

Plastic and metal ice cream and other large catering containers

These are not suitable for using outside in winter because frost can penetrate easily, …Read More

potting-compost-image

The Invisible Garden continued

Mobile homes
Some sites allocate a small amount of garden per unit, but if the site owner or local authority prefers the public open-plan approach to the overall landscaping, there is usually still enough space around the home – on the paths, sitting-out areas, etc., to grow a wide range of plants in containers. Some mobile home manufacturers actually incorporate window boxes or other planting areas into their designs. The walls …Read More

Geranium

Make an early start with summer bedding – Gardening with Daphne Ledward

Are you intending to save money and grow your own bedding plants from seed this year? While many can be sown up to the middle of April and still give a good show, some types are fairly slow to germinate and grow on, and should be sown as soon as possible so they are ready for planting out in late May and early June. Pelargoniums (bedding geraniums), begonias and lobelia are …Read More