Chemicals

Next to the peat issue, chemicals are probably the most emotive topic on the gardening front at the present time. Garden chemicals are basically either organic (derived from natural sources) or inorganic, though some compound fertilizers and insecticide mixtures can be a combination of both.
Those gardeners who prefer only to use chemicals of natural origin often shun those from any other source. It is quite possible to control most common pests …Read More

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The Peat Issue

A decade ago, if you wanted to use peat in the garden, you did so with a clear conscience. Then some of our best-known media gardening pundits suddenly became aware that a lot of the peat being used in this country was being dug from environmentally sensitive moorland sites, destroying habitat and rare plant and animal wildlife which it would be almost impossible to re-establish.
Gardeners and horticulturalists, of course, got …Read More

Garden Winter Tips

In Due Season – December

Most of the work suggested for November can continue through December as long as the weather does not deteriorate. Seed catalogues will usually arrive this month, so you can sort out next year’s orders.
Request our catalogue now!

Cover any plants arriving in bad weather with sacking in a shed or garage till conditions improve.
Do not forget to knock the snow off evergreens and make a hole in the ice on …Read More

bonfire

Shredding and composting vs burning

Shredding and composting v. burning. Most gardeners enjoy a good burn-up. There is something very satisfying about seeing a pile of rubbish reduced to a pile of ashes which can then be spread on the garden as a useful source of potash. Unfortunately, bonfires in recent years have become very unpopular, with smoke and smuts dirtying property and gases polluting the upper atmosphere.

The alternative to this is composting. Garden …Read More

Oak Tree

The ‘Green’ Gardener part 2

Indigenous wildflowers are vital to the ecology of an area, not just for their attractive appearance, but because they are host plants to many species of butterfly and moth. It is not easy to give over all or part of your garden to their cultivation though, as you will often see recommended. There is much more to growing wildflowers than scattering a few packets of seed or allowing the weeds …Read More

The ‘Green’ Gardener

It cannot have escaped your notice that ‘environmentally friendly’ is the phrase of the moment. Green is the ‘in’ colour, whether it be in relationship to cleaning products, constructional materials or horticulture.
Nowhere has this desire for a greener, more pleasant land had more effect than on the world of gardening. Most people are more aware of potential damage to the environment and are anxious for remedies causing as little harm …Read More

The water saving garden part 3

Generally speaking, container growing is a water-extravagant form of gardening as most plants grown in containers dry out much faster than if they were planted direct into the garden soil. On the other hand, ornamental tubs and the like can be a very attractive feature of a garden. If for one reason or another containers are essential, use as large ones as possible, fill with soil-based compost, and incorporate water-retaining …Read More

The Water Saving Garden part 2

If seeing your lawn turn straw-like every time the temperature rises and rainfall drops off worries you, you may be happier replacing it with gravel or paving. Paving a sunny spot will make the area even hotter, and this will have an effect on the plants you choose in the vicinity. If you cannot live without a lawn, a very high-grade mix will usually recover better after drought than an …Read More

rain-butt

The water saving garden

Most gardens can be modified to use much less water than they already do. There are many ways to make a garden much more thrifty where supplementary watering is concerned. How many of these ideas are necessary depends very much on geographical location and temporary climatic conditions, but there are few gardens which would not benefit in some way from at least one of these ideas. Remember, too, that cutting …Read More

Autumn-Garden-Tips-Nov

In Due Season – November

This is the month of clearing and planting. In all parts of the garden, move spent plantings and crops and compost or burn. Cut-down dead perennials and shred the prunings. Sweep up and collect leaves.
Many gardeners prefer to do the bulk of their rose pruning this month and in all but the very coldest parts of the country, if you want to leave the garden as tidy as possible for …Read More